October 20, 2012

Care for Alzheimer's Caregivers – Assisted Living Richmond, VA

"Do as I say, and not as I do." That's the subtext of these suggestions to other Alzheimer's caregivers.

When it comes to looking after yourself, as well as the patient, and scheduling the needed breaks away from caregiving, I plead mea culpa. Like so many others, I postponed my own doctor's appointments telling myself I didn't have the time, and turning down invitations from friends, believing that, not only was I "The One," but I was "The Only One."

For two years, I did not leave my husband, who suffers from Alzheimer's. That was partly because I did not want to miss any of the moments of clarity that were left to us, and partly because I felt responsible, and fearful that something would happen to him when I wasn't present. Kindly, but firm words from two doctor friends helped me decide to take the occasional afternoon for myself.

And I will never forget the first time I did. It was early in his staging. I wasn't comfortable about leaving him alone in the house, but he was offended that I had arranged for someone to stay with him. When I told him that this was for me, that I would not be able to go unless I knew that someone was on hand in case he fell, he acquiesced. That he was humouring his over-protective wife made it acceptable to his pride.

I am not likely to forget the betrayed look in his eyes when I finally left. And I swear that when I returned he was standing in the same place by the door, waiting for me, with the same baleful look. Over the years, my husband has become more forgiving about my leaving from time to time.

My husband did not like the first "sitter" because she swayed from routine. Next time around, I did a better job of informing the stand-in caregiver about the established routine.

I waited too long to take the occasional afternoon off, and far too long to seek or accept regular help, and did that only then because his physical condition had worsened and I could not manage by myself. As a result, I was exhausted, breaking the first and most important rule for the caregiver: stay healthy, physically and emotionally. Alzheimer’s caregivers need to seek out the resources available -- family, friends, assisted living. If you need help to find out what is available, do get in touch with your local branch of the Alzheimer's Association.

I was not The Only One who could take care of my patient: Neither are you. That break doesn't have to be a social occasion. A good walk can help regain perspective. Swimming also does that for me. Exercise can be an excellent anti-depressant.

And music -- played at home, listened to in a church or synagogue, in a concert hall -- music offers very real nourishment for my spirit. During the summer, I attended a Mostly Mozart concert with my daughter. To be with her in an auditorium with hundreds of others, gathered together for the sole purpose of listening to beautiful music -- I found myself thinking there is hope for the world after all.

And I discovered anew the truth in Congreve's words -- the knots in my neck and shoulders were like the knots in the oak that he describes in this quotation:

"Music has charms to sooth a savage breast,To soften rocks or bend a knotted oak."

However difficult it may seem, dear fellow caregiver, I do hope that you will take steps to soften the rocks in your path, and bend the knots of frustration and sorrow. Listen to the music of life. It not only plays on, it awaits.

If it is time for assisted living in Richmond, VA then it is time to contact Spring Arbor.